Hydration Tips

July 2017

Summer is here and so is the heat! During these hot days be sure to stay hydrated by following some of these tips.

Hydration_July_revised

High Blood Pressure Awareness Month

May 2017

May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month and ITCA WIC would like to share some information with you. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, increases the risk of certain diseases and stroke. Heart disease and stroke are the first and seventh major causes of death amongst American Indians and Alaska Natives respectively and yet many people with high blood pressure don’t even know they have it due to a lack of signs and symptoms. High Blood Pressure Education Month encourages people to get their blood pressure checked regularly and to look at various lifestyle factors which may be contributing to high blood pressure. Check out the following resources to find out what you can do to control your blood pressure.

High Blood Pressure Education_Infographic_May
5 Surprising Facts About High Blood Pressure 
Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke & Cardiac Arrest
Definition, Causes, Treatment and Prevention of High Blood Pressure

 

 

Stay Active in the Winter

Just because it’s the holiday season, doesn’t mean you need to take a holiday from your exercise regimen. In fact, working out during the winter has many benefits. Check out the following for information regarding physical activity during these winter month that lie ahead:

Stay Active_December_Infographic_Page_1

https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@fc/documents/downloadable/ucm_457235.pdf

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/FitnessBasics/Staying-Active-in-Cold-Weather_UCM_479901_Article.jsp#.WDN_xtIrJaQ

http://igrow.org/healthy-families/health-and-wellness/physical-activity-cold-weather/

American Diabetes Month

November 2016

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona is honoring American Diabetes Month. Diabetes rates are on the rise in the US. Today, 1 in 11 Americans has diabetes and every 23 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes. American Indians have a 2.2 times higher likelihood to have diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites. There was a 68% increase in diabetes between 1994 and 2004 among American Indian youths aged 15-19. Data from the 2009 Indian Health Services’ (IHS) National Patient Information Reporting System (NPIRS) indicate that 14.2 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives aged 20 years or older who received care from IHS had diagnosed diabetes. Statistics show that diabetes causes more deaths than AIDS and breast cancer combined.

People with diabetes can experience serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, blindness, chronic kidney disease, nervous system damage, and amputations. But people with diabetes who work with their health care providers and take care of their health can take steps to control the disease and lower the risk of complications and premature death.

There are a few types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational. Type 1 is also referred to as juvenile diabetes because it typically appears in adolescence. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5 percent of people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases. This form of diabetes is caused by a combination of things; genetics, extra weight, specifically extra fat around the waist, and more. Gestational diabetes only appears in pregnant women and develops in 2 to 10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually disappears when a pregnancy is over. However, if not treated, it can cause problems for mothers and babies.

The CDC reports that healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic therapies for type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes require oral medication, insulin, or both to control blood glucose levels. Healthy eating, physical activity, and insulin injections are the basic therapies for type 1 diabetes. The amount of insulin taken must be balanced with food intake and daily activities. Blood glucose levels must be closely monitored through frequent blood glucose testing. People should see a health care provider who will monitor their diabetes control and help them learn to manage their diabetes. People with diabetes also may see ophthalmologists for eye examinations; podiatrists for routine foot care; and dietitians and diabetes educators who teach the skills needed for daily diabetes management

Adapted from: https://www.cdc.gov/media/matte/2011/11_diabetes_Native_American.pdf

For more information, check out:
Diabetes Month Infographic
http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/american-diabetes-month.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/about-niddk/research-areas/diabetes/diabetes-prevention-program-dpp/message-hope-prevent-diabetes-native-american-communities/Pages/default.aspx

World Food Day

October 2016

The Food and Agriculture Organization put out the following information regarding World Food Day 2016:

Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too.

One of the biggest issues related to climate change is food supply and food security and with our population growing each day, this problem affects more and more people. Everyone has a role to play in lessening the effects of climate change. Countries need to invest in stallholder farmers and sustainably increase food production, but there are also a number of actions that you can take to help. By being a conscientious or ethical consumer and changing simple day-to-day decisions, for example, by wasting less food, or eating less meat, we can reduce our environmental footprint and make a difference.

For more information on World Food Day and how to do your part to reduce food loss and our carbon footprint, check out the following resources:

http://www.fao.org/world-food-day/2016/theme/en/
http://www.fao.org/world-food-day/2016/climate-actions/en/

World Food Day Infographic_October_new

 

Fruit and Veggies – More Matters

September 2016

The Inter Tribal Council on Arizona is celebrating September with the Fruit and Veggies – More Matters Campaign. The American Indian population has among the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States. Studies have shown that among overweight adults, higher intakes of green leafy or dark yellow vegetables were significantly associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of both adults and children do not eat the amount of fruits and vegetables recommended by the latest dietary guidelines. Dietitians recommend filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables.  Try these tips to help meet this goal:

  1. Fruit Skewers – Frozen fruit chunks such as grapes, banana slices, blueberries, mango or watermelon on skewers – make a rainbow on a stick.
  2. Breakfast Boost – Add bananas or berries to your morning cereal or oatmeal. If you eat an omelet, add bell peppers and onions for some extra flavor and nutrition.
  3. Fill up on Veggies – Making soup, pizza, sandwiches, or lasagna? Try adding some vegetables such as spinach, tomatoes, bell peppers, carrots, mushrooms, etc.
  4. Be Sneaky – If you have a picky eater, try shredding or finely dicing some veggies into some of their favorite dishes.
  5. Feature a Fresh New Vegetable– have your child pick out a new vegetable each week and incorporate that vegetable into your meals or snacks. Children are much more likely to try something new when they pick it out themselves.
  6. Goodbye Cookie – Try offering fruits and veggies with a dip as a snack instead of cookies or crackers.  Studies show the popularity of serving cookies as a children’s’ snack is on the decline. Fruit is now the number one snack item parents give to children under the age of six. Try sliced cucumbers, carrots, bell peppers, apples etc.
  7. Smoothies – Try using yogurt and your favorite mixture of fruits to blend together into a smoothie as a refreshing drink.
  8. Salad on the side – Try offering a small side salad at dinner time. Children can fill their plate with how ever much they want.

 

Reasons why to eat more fruits and vegetables?

  1. They are delicious!
  2. Fun to eat – some crunch, squirt, some you can peel, and some you can grow in your own backyard!
  3. Quick, convenient, and natural – fruits and vegetables are natures treat – they are very portable and easy to pack as a snack.
  4. Variety – They come in so many colors, shapes, and sizes.
  5. Vitamins and minerals – they pack a lot of nutrients to keep you feeling healthy and energized.
  6. May reduce risk of diseases – eating a variety of fruits and vegetables may reduce a person’s risk of many diseased including heart disease, high blood pressure, and cancer.
  7. Low in calories.
  8. Fiber – fruits and veggies provide fiber that helps fill you up and keeps your digestive system happy.

Adapted from: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/September+is+Fruits+%26+Veggies–More+Matters+Month

To learn more about the importance of fruits and veggies, check out the following resources:
Fruit and Veggies – More Matters Infographic
http://www.choosemyplate.gov/
https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary-guidance/fruits-veggies-more-matters-resources/fruits-veggies-more-matters

 

Beat the Heat! Stay Hydrated!

Arizona is one of the hottest places on earth from May to September which makes heat related illness very common during these months. Over 1,500 deaths from exposure to excessive natural heat have occurred in Arizona from 2000 to 2012. Anyone can be affected by heat-related illness but children under 4 years of age are at an even greater risk. One of the best ways to prevent heat related illness is to stay hydrated. The amount of water someone needs is variable depending on age, heat exposure, activity and other factors. Everyone should drink enough water to quench their thirst, however in extreme heat; we may forget to drink enough water. Most people will need at least 8-10 cups of water under normal conditions. More water may be needed if it is hot and the person is active. Try to minimize alcohol and caffeine intake because these drink may dehydrate you more. Offer kids water instead of sugary beverages such as juice, soda, Gatorade, kool-aid, and sweet tea.

Heat-related illness usually comes in stages. The signal of the first stage is thirst. Drinking water at this stage can prevent you from progressing to the more serious kinds of heat related illnesses. When temperatures are on the rise, watch for these other symptoms of heat related illness:
• Thirst, dry mouth and skin
• Headache
• Dizziness and confusion
• Nausea
• Fatigue
• Less frequent urination
• Increased heart rate
Check out the following resources to stay cool this summer and stay hydrated.

Stay Hydrated Infographic

Hydration- What you need to know

Hydration- Why It’s so Important

WIC services begin at NACA in Flagstaff

Native Americans for Community Action (NACA) began offering WIC services in Flagstaff on June 28, 2016! Call 928-773-1245 for an appointment or visit them at 1500 E. Cedar Ave, Suite 26 in Flagstaff.

National Safety Month

June 2016

ITCA WIC is honoring June as Safety Month by sharing some important safety tips for women, infants, and children.

Food Safety

Every child is at risk for choking, but children under the age of 4 years are more likely to choke because they have narrow throats and airways, cannot chew very well due to lack of teeth, and they often put things in their mouths.

Knowing about choking risks and safety tips can help prevent choking. The link below shows foods that are choking risks and foods to avoid for children under the age of 1. Follow these guidelines to help keep your children safe:

Prepare Safe Foods:

  • Cut foods into small pieces no larger than ½ inch
  • Cut meat across the grain into thin small pieces
  • Offer soft cooked chicken, fish, beef, or turkey that is easy to chew
  • Slice grapes, cherry tomatoes, and other round foods into 2 or 4 small pieces
  • Cook carrot sticks or broccoli pieces until slightly soft
  • Grate raw vegetables
  • Spread peanut butter thinly on bread, crackers, or tortillas
  • Do not let your child eat a glob of peanut butter on a spoon

Eat Safe:

  • Have your child sit down while eating at the table
  • Do not let your child run, walk, play, or lie down while eating
  • Stay with your child while eating
  • Watch your child while eating
  • Keep unsafe foods out of reach
  • Teach your child to chew food well before swallowing
  • Learn how to help a child who is choking by taking CPR/First Aid classes in the community

Pregnant women need to be careful about food safety. According to the CDC, 48 million persons get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from illness caused by food in the United States each year. Pregnant women and their unborn children have a higher risk of developing certain foodborne illnesses because their ability to fight off infection is lower when pregnant. Use the links below for foods that should be avoided during pregnancy and safe cooking tips.

http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/UCM312787.pdf

http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/choking-hazard-safety


Car Seat Safety

Each year, thousands of young children are killed or injured in car crashes. In fact, the CDC reports motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for American Indians aged 1–44. On average, 2 American Indians are killed every day in motor vehicle crashes.  American Indians are injured or killed in motor vehicle crashes at much higher rates than other Americans and have lower use rates of car seats, booster seats, and seat belts.

Proper use of car seats helps keep children safe. With so many different styles and seats available, it may be hard to tell which one is the right one. The type of seat your child needs depends on several things, including your child’s age and size and the type of vehicle you have. Read the links below for information on selecting the correct seat for your child and other car seat safety tips.  You may be able to get a free car seat in your area. Ask your local fire or police departments about free car seats in your area.

http://www.safekids.org/

http://www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov/newtsm/cpsweek2014/NHTSA-2014-CPSWeek-

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/on-the-go/Pages/Car-Safety-Seats-Information-for-Families.aspx

National Safety Month Infographic

Dental Awareness Month

April 2016

Taking good care of your teeth is not just about having a nice smile and pleasant breath.  A healthy mouth may help you ward off medical conditions.

Tooth decay is a significant health problem for American Indians.  In 2014, more than 2.4 million American Indians lived in counties with dental care shortage areas, and half of all American Indian children lived in a shortage area. In fact, preschool-aged American Indian children had four times more cases of untreated tooth decay than white children—43 percent compared with 11 percent. Studies show that it appears the prevalence of dental disease among American Indians is increasing. Read on to learn more about how poor dental health can affect your overall health.

Poorly Controlled Diabetes: If you have diabetes, you’re already at increased risk of developing gum disease. But chronic gum disease may, in fact, make diabetes more difficult to control. An infection may cause insulin resistance, which affects blood sugar control.

Cardiovascular Disease: Oral inflammation due to bacteria, also called gingivitis, may also play a role in clogged arteries and blood clots. It appears that bacteria in the mouth may cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation may cause buildup of plaques in the arteries, possibly increasing your risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Preterm Birth: Severe gum disease may increase the risk of preterm delivery and giving birth to a low birth weight baby. Research estimates  that as many as 18 percent of preterm, low birth weight babies born in the U.S. each year may be attributed to oral infections. They suspect oral bacteria release toxins, which reach the placenta through the mother’s bloodstream and interfere with the growth and development of the fetus.

Nutrition: Sensitivity in the mouth or pain while eating caused by dental problems can affect the foods we chose to eat. This can result in elimination of entire food groups which can greatly affect our health. Be sure to talk to your dentist about any pain or sensitivity in your mouth during your routine checkups.

Start taking care of your oral health early on in life because you’re making an investment in your overall health, not just for now, but for the future, too. See the information below to find steps to care for your mouth in all stages of life.

Dental Awareness Month Infographic

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/

National Nutrition Month

March 2016

For National Nutrition Month® 2016, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ITCA are encouraging everyone to “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right”. Food works as fuel for our bodies and gives us the nutrients we need to fight off disease, heal wounds, bring life into this world, and more. Food is a source of enjoyment, a means of social gatherings, and something that brings us all together. Take this month to savor the food that does so much for us with some of these tips:

Enjoy Social Experiences 
Whenever an important event or holiday comes around, what do we all gather together to do? EAT! Gathering around food to share and converse with friends and family is something that puts everyone in a good mood. Even something as simple as a nightly family dinner has been proven to be beneficial in terms of strengthening family relationships as well as healthy eating. Savor those moments.

Appreciate Foods Pleasures and Flavors 
In today’s busy world, many of us eat on the run and don’t even sit down for a bite. This has resulted in many of us eating quickly and mindlessly. Slow down. Savor each bite and actually experience your food. Eating slower has been linked to eating less because your stomach has time to tell your brain it is getting full.

Flavor your Food in a Healthy Way
Sugar, fat, and salt are three of the things Americans tend to consume in excess.

Sugar: 50% of the sugar in the typical diet comes from sweetened beverages and another 25% comes from sweet treats. Try to:

  • Cut back on the amount of sugar added to things you eat or drink regularly like coffee or iced tea.
  • Buy low-calorie beverages or better yet, drink water! Try making it exciting by flavoring it with your favorite fruits or vegetables.

Fat: The average American eats 26 grams of saturated fat per day. That’s almost twice the recommended amount. To cut down, try to:

  • Use canola or olive oil for cooking instead of butter or lard.
  • Try baking, broiling, or grilling foods as opposed to frying.
  • Replace whole-fat dairy with low-fat or nonfat milk, yogurt, and cheese.
  • Replace meats with skinless chicken or fish a few days a week.

Salt: Nearly all Americans consume too much salt and 75% of salt comes from eating processed and restaurant foods. Try to:

  • Limit salty condiments such as ketchup and salad dressing. Try a yogurt-based dip instead.
  • Instead of deli meats like bologna, salami, ham, and hot dogs, try baked chicken or turkey in sandwiches.
  • Skip the salt and try salt-free seasonings such as herbs, spices, garlic, vinegar, black pepper or lemon juice.

For more information on National Nutrition Month, visit:

Heart Disease Awareness Month

February 2016

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona WIC Program is increasing awareness of the prevalence of heart disease in the United States, particularly in American Indian women. Heart disease causes one in three deaths in women each year. That equates to one woman every minute. American Indians die from heart diseases at younger ages than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Thirty–six percent of those who die of heart disease die before age 65. February is National Heart Month so join us in taking a stand against America’s top killer, heart disease, because 80% of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action.

The first step is becoming familiar with your family history. The information you provide will help your doctor be on the lookout for early signs of the same diseases in you and your children. Go to your doctor for regular physicals and screenings for blood pressure and cholesterol. This is especially important because heart disease may have no symptoms.

We can also take measures every day to help keep our hearts healthy.

Eat Well: Eat foods that will fuel your body by:

  • Limiting processed and packaged foods which are loaded with salt
  • Cutting down on fried foods such as fry bread, red meats such as mutton, as well as lard and cheeses
  • Eating more fiber through fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • Drinking plenty of water everyday

Exercise Well: Manage your weight. Choose activities that you will enjoy doing such as hiking, gardening, or traditional dancing. You can do anything physical that keeps your heart rate up for 30 minutes 5 days a week. If you don’t have time for a whole workout, try doing spouts of exercise for just 10 mins a few times throughout the day.

Live Well: Try to adopt healthy habits that help manage stress such as smudging or exercise. Make sure you get enough sleep each night.  When you’re asleep, your heart rate and blood pressure go down. That gives your heart a much needed break. Avoid smoking and limit alcohol intake.

February is a month to take a stand against heart disease. Talk to your doctor and start making healthy choices each and every day. For more information, check out these r esources:

New WIC client video now available!

ITCA is pleased to announce that videos are now available in English and Spanish to help new WIC clients learn about WIC and how to use WIC benefits!

Check out the videos here!

National Birth Defects Prevention Month

January 2016

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona is working to raise awareness of birth defects and to promote strategies that can reduce the risk of birth defects and their complications.  The National Birth Defects Prevention Network’s 2016 theme is Making Healthy Choices to Prevent Birth Defects: Make a PACT for Prevention.”  Although not all birth defects can be prevented, the community can help all women, including teens, who could become pregnant or are pregnant to lower their risk of having babies with birth defects by encouraging them to follow some basic health guidelines throughout their reproductive years:

Plan ahead

  • Get as healthy as you can before you get pregnant.
  • Get 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid every day.

Avoid harmful substances

  • Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking.
  • Be careful with harmful exposures at work and at home.

Choose a healthy lifestyle

  • Eat a healthy diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low fat dairy, lean proteins, and healthy fats and oils.
  • Be physically active.
  • Work to get medical conditions like diabetes under control.  

Talk to your healthcare provider

  • Get a medical checkup.
  • Discuss all medications, both prescription and over-the-counter.
  • Talk about your family medical history.

January is a perfect time to call additional attention to the importance of folic acid in preventing certain birth defects.  The United States Public Health Service recommends that all women of childbearing age consume 400 micrograms (400mcg or .4mg) of folic acid daily to prevent up to 50 – 70% of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

You can make a difference in the lives of our families.

For more information on Birth Defects Prevention, visit:

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September 2015

33% of children in the United States are overweight or obese.  43% of American Indian children aged 2-4 are overweight or obese.  Childhood obesity puts kids at risk for health problems that were once seen only in adults, like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.  There is a greater risk for breathing problems, such as sleep apnea and asthma and social and psychological problems such as discrimination and poor self-esteem in children with obesity.

The good news is that childhood obesity can be prevented.  In honor of National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, ITCA encourages your family to make healthy changes together.

  • Get active:  Go for a family walk; play music and have a dance party; play with a ball,
    inside or outside the home; go to a wellness or recreational center; or join a sports team.
  • Limit screen time: Keep screen time (including video games, computers, tablets, cellphones and TV’s) to 2 hours or less per day.  Children under 2 should have no screen time.
  • Make healthy meals and snacks: Buy and serve more fruit and vegetables and whole grains.  Have children help with simple tasks when preparing meals and snacks.
  • Serve healthy drinks: Water, fat free and low fat milk (for children 2 and older), and juice with vitamin C in limited amounts.

Taking small steps as a family can help your child stay at a healthy weight.

For more information on Childhood Obesity, visit:

For more information on healthy eating and physical activity, visit:

World Breastfeeding Week

August 1-7, 2015

Every August, ITCA WIC highlights the importance of promoting, protecting, and supporting breastfeeding by celebrating World Breastfeeding Week and National Breastfeeding Month. The theme this year is Breastfeeding and Work – Let’s Make it Work! The theme is focused on recognizing and promoting lactation support in the work place.

Worldwide, more than 170 countries celebrate World Breastfeeding Week. At the community level, ITCA WIC clinics will be hosting health fairs, community walking and running events, and breastfeeding talking circles. Activities and events will help spread awareness about the importance of breastfeeding and the risks of not breastfeeding, along with supporting moms in the workplace.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, both babies and mothers gain many benefits from breastfeeding. Human milk provides the most complete form of nutrition for infants. Breast milk is easy to digest and offers breastfeeding infants protection against bacterial and viral infections. Research indicates that women who breastfeed may have lower rates of certain breast and ovarian cancers. Breastfeeding also helps mother’s health and healing following childbirth.

For more information about ITCA WIC’s support of World Breastfeeding Week or a local agency’s planned activities, please contact Claresa Bedonie at (602)-307-1510, or email claresa.bedonie@itcaonline.com. For more information and ideas on how to celebrate World Breastfeeding Week 2015, visit http://worldbreastfeedingweek.org/.

United States Department of Agricultural (USDA) National Breastfeeding Week Proclamation 

Invitation for Public Comment on WIC

ITCA is holding its annual public comment period for WIC from June 11, 2015 to July 10, 2015. You are invited to comment on the program and to assist in identifying opportunities to improve services.
Invitation for Public Comment

Yogurt and Whole Wheat Pasta, Fresh Fruit and Veggies for Infants, now available on WIC!

Effective April 1, 2015, ITCA WIC added yogurt and whole wheat pasta to the foods available on WIC! Women and children participating in WIC will be able to purchase a 32 ounce container of a variety of plain or flavored yogurt. Loaded with calcium, vitamin D and protein, yogurt can be used for parfaits with fruit and cereal, as a dip for fruit or as a topping to tacos. Whole wheat pasta will be allowed as an option in addition to the whole wheat bread or tortillas, corn tortillas or brown rice currently offered. Whole wheat pasta is loaded with fiber and is so versatile- it can be used in soups, macaroni salads or pasta dishes.

Parents will be happy to hear that babies 9 months and older will have the option to receive a check for up to $8 in fresh fruit and veggies if their child is developmentally ready for finger foods! This allows parents to provide appropriate foods for their baby’s age.
Whole Wheat Pasta with Vegetables and CheeseYogurt parfait

WIC: Strengthening Families for 40 Years

2014-WIC-button-smallversion

We are happy to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of WIC! WIC is one of our country’s most important public health programs, and it has enriched the lives of millions of families over the years. WIC improves birth outcomes, reduces infant mortality, and prepares kids for learning.

We are excited to join with the National WIC Association in this celebration by sharing the video and print materials they created to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of WIC. They have developed short animated videos and print pieces to help illustrate what WIC does and how it helps strengthen families. Go to WICturns40.org to view these amazing materials.

ITCA WIC 40th Anniversary Proclamation

 

Fresh Bananas coming to WIC for infants!

The new food rule released in May 2014 by USDA allows WIC to provide bananas to infants as a substitute for a portion of the allowed baby foods. ITCA will begin issuing checks with bananas on October 1, 2014.

Fresh bananas are being added to address the changing developmental needs over time.  Fresh bananas allow parents to provide the appropriate texture for the baby depending on the age and needs of the baby.

Click here for more information.

Introducing WIC’s New Look

WIC Logo

ITCA WIC has a new look!

WIC has a new logo that reflects the revitalized energy that we use every day to offer participant-centered services to WIC clients across the state.  WIC staff provides individualized care and positive support to each and every WIC family.

Watch for our new look beginning October 1, 2013 on ID folders, vendor window decals and nutrition education materials.

nmd runnner nmd runnner black nmd runnner white nmd runnner grey nmd runnner gs ultra boost ultra boost black ultra boost white ultra boost grey ultra boost gs ultra boost uncaged ultra boost uncaged black ultra boost uncaged white ultra boost uncaged grey ultra boost uncaged gs yeezy boost 350 yeezy boost 350 black yeezy boost 350 white yeezy boost 350 grey yeezy boost 350 gs yeezy boost 350 v2 yeezy boost 350 v2 black yeezy boost 350 v2 white yeezy boost 350 v2 grey yeezy boost 350 v2 gs yeezy boost 750 yeezy boost 750 black yeezy boost 750 white yeezy boost 750 grey yeezy boost 750 gs
jordan retro 7 gs jordan retro 7 black jordan retro 7 white jordan retro 7 grey jordan retro 7 gs jordan retro 7 jordan 7 retro black jordan 7 retro white jordan 7 retro grey jordan 7 retro gs jordan 12 retro jordan 12 retro black jordan 12 retro white jordan 12 retro grey jordan 12 retro gs jordan 12 retro gs jordan retro 12 black jordan retro 12 white jordan retro 12 grey jordan retro 12 gs