Closely Spaced Pregnancies

We know you love your little bundle of joy. How could you not, look how cute they are! But with almost 50% of pregnancies in the U.S. being unplanned, we understand that many people may have wanted that bundle of joy a little later in life.  Luckily, families have more control over child spacing than ever before.

Most studies show that 18-24 months between pregnancies is ideal for multiple reasons including the health of the mother and the baby.  Check out some of the other reasons here:

Closely Spaced Pregnancies Infographic

Test your knowledge on pregnancy spacing:

True or False:

  1. You cannot get pregnant while breastfeeding.
  2. It is not recommended to continue taking your prenatal vitamin while breastfeeding.
  3. Over 50% of ITCA WIC moms spaced out their pregnancies by at least 18 months.
  4. One reason to space out pregnancies is to reduce the risk for birth defects.

Answer Key:

  1. False
  2. True
  3. True
  4. False

Whole Grains Month

September 2018

September is whole grains month and ITCA WIC encourages all of you to make at least half your grains whole! Consuming whole grains has many proven benefits such as reduced risks of cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. The consumption of them can lower cholesterol and blood pressure as well as improve digestion.

The Whole Grains Council has provided the following ways to slowly increase your intake of whole grains:

  • Buy three different loaves of whole-grain bread and taste all of them to see which one you like best.
  • Serve bulgur or brown rice instead of potatoes with dinner one night this month.
  • Look for the Whole Grain Stamp every time you shop.
  • Try a new breakfast cereal with whole grains as the first ingredient.
  • Buy some whole-wheat pasta and try it.
  • Make my favorite whole grain recipe for a friend.
  • On the weekend, try cooking a pot of steel-cut oatmeal.
  • Make pizza for the kids with whole wheat pita as the crust.
  • Serve hamburgers with whole wheat buns this week.

Whole Grains Infographic

Happy Whole Grains Month!

Emergency Preparedness & Food Recalls

Online Training

PowerPoint Presentations

Helpful Resources

Food Recalls

National Breastfeeding Month

August 2018

Every year, ITCA WIC local agencies highlight the importance of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding by celebrating World Breastfeeding Week and National Breastfeeding Month during the month of August.  This year’s theme of Breastfeeding: Foundation of Life celebrates how breastfeeding prevents hunger and malnutrition and ensures food security for babies, especially in times of crises.

Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction:

  • Breastfeeding is a natural and low-cost way of feeding babies and children. It is affordable for everyone and does not burden household budgets compared to formula feeding.  Breastfeeding can contribute to poverty reduction.
  • Breastmilk is FREE.  Not breastfeeding results in financial losses of about $302 billion each year. Families worldwide spend about $54 billion every year on formula.
  • Exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding for two years and beyond provide high quality nutrients and adequate energy that can help prevent hunger, undernutrition and obesity. Breastfeeding means food security for infants.

National Breastfeeding Month Infographic

For more information regarding World Breastfeeding Week, check out the following resources:

WABA – World Breastfeeding Week
WHO – Breastfeeding

 

Portion Control

June 2018

Tips on managing your portions at home and when eating out.

just the infographic

ICIN Meeting dates & information


Future ICIN Meetings:

Call-In Information
Phone Number: 1-800-832-0736
Room Number: 8215391#

Tuesday September 4, 2018 – Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc. – Phoenix, AZ


Past ICIN Meeting Documents:

April 3, 2018 Meeting – Yavapai-Prescott Tribe Documents

Tuesday July 17, 2018 – 9:00 am to 12:00 pm – Little America Resort, Flagstaff, Arizona

 

Tribal Law Enforcement News & Information

ICIN Resources

ICIN Resources

Resources listed here are for Tribal Law Enforcement and Tribal Communities for information and reporting purposes:

ICIN Links

State of Arizona Links:

Law Enforcement:

Certification:

Intelligence and Criminal Justice:

Federal Links:

Law Enforcement Organizations:

Age Appropriate Nutritional Foods

April 2018

Tips on age appropriate foods for infants and children 18 months and younger.

Age Approrpriate Food Inforgraphic

National Nutrition Month

March 2018

“Go Further with Food”

A Public Service Message from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Whether you’re starting the day off right with a healthy breakfast or fueling before a workout, the foods you choose can make a real difference. March is National Nutrition Month, the time to return to the basics of healthful eating. This year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to “Go Further with Food.” Planning meals and snacks in advance will add nutrients, save you money and help reduce food waste. Here are some tips:

  • Create a meal prep plan that includes a variety of your favorite, healthful foods.
  • Buy only the amount of food that your family can eat or freeze within a few days and plan ways to use leftovers later in the week.
  • Be mindful of portion sizes – just eat and drink the amount that’s right for you.

In order to find a personalized plan that works best for you and your family, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist. Learn how to go further with food and find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in your area by visiting eatright.org  and following hashtag National Nutrition Month.

National Nutrition Month Handouts and Tips for Families and Communities

NNM Photo

American Heart Month

February 2018

February is American Heart month and the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona and the American Heart Association want to help everyone live longer, healthier lives by getting the word out on heart health. With cardiovascular disease accounting for nearly 801,000 deaths in the US, American Heart Month is an attempt to remind Americans to focus on their health. Check out the infographic below for more information:

American Heart Month Infographic

You can also help raise awareness, particularly on February 2nd, which is National Wear Red Day. Why wear red? It’s because February 2nd is a day that has been dedicated to helping raise awareness of the high risk of stroke and other cardiac events in women. By wearing red, you are helping spread the word that 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. Take control of your own health and encourage other women to do the same by knowing their numbers: Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI). Knowing these numbers can help women and their healthcare provider determine their risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Wear red, share your photos on social media, spread the word!

Dental Awareness

October 2017

Taking good care of your teeth is not just about having a nice smile and pleasant breath.  A healthy mouth may help you ward off medical conditions.

Tooth decay is a significant health problem for American Indians.  In 2014, more than 2.4 million American Indians lived in counties with dental care shortage areas, and half of all American Indian children lived in a shortage area. In fact, preschool-aged American Indian children had four times more cases of untreated tooth decay than white children—43 percent compared with 11 percent. Studies show that it appears the prevalence of dental disease among American Indians is increasing. Read on to learn more about how poor dental health can affect your overall health.

Poorly Controlled Diabetes: If you have diabetes, you’re already at increased risk of developing gum disease. But chronic gum disease may, in fact, make diabetes more difficult to control. An infection may cause insulin resistance, which affects blood sugar control.

Cardiovascular Disease: Oral inflammation due to bacteria called gingivitis may play a role in clogged arteries and blood clots. It appears that bacteria in the mouth may cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation may cause buildup of plaques in the arteries, possibly increasing your risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Preterm Birth: Severe gum disease may increase the risk of preterm delivery and giving birth to a low birth weight baby. Research estimates  that as many as 18 percent of preterm, low birth weight babies born in the U.S. each year may be attributed to oral infections. They suspect oral bacteria release toxins, which reach the placenta through the mother’s bloodstream and interfere with the growth and development of the fetus.

Nutrition: Sensitivity in the mouth or pain while eating caused by dental problems can affect the foods we chose to eat. This can result in elimination of entire food groups which can greatly affect our health. Be sure to talk to your dentist about any pain or sensitivity in your mouth during your routine checkups.

Start taking care of your oral health early on in life because you’re making an investment in your overall health, not just for now, but for the future, too. See the information below to find steps to care for your mouth in all stages of life.

Dental Awareness Infographic

Healthy Mouth –  http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/

Fruit and Veggies – More Matters Month

September 2017

This month aims to bring your attention to eating more fruits and vegetables, whatever that may mean to you. You could add one more to your plate, try a fruit or veggie that is new to you, learn about fruits and vegetables, teach your kids, or try a new recipe.

Why is it so important to eat fruits and vegetables? The American Indian population has among the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States. Studies have shown that among overweight adults, higher intakes of green leafy or dark yellow vegetables were significantly associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of both adults and children do not eat the amount of fruits and vegetables recommended by the latest dietary guidelines. Dietitians recommend filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables.  Check out this link for tips to help meet this goal:

http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/quick-guide-to-getting-more-fruits-and-vegetables

FV More Matters_September

National Breastfeeding Month

August 2017

Every year, ITCA WIC local agencies highlight the importance of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding by celebrating National Breastfeeding Month.  This year’s theme of Sustaining Breastfeeding Together celebrates working together for the common good, so that mothers are supported and protected in their breastfeeding efforts.   It continues to focus on sustainable development to better the planet for the generations to come.  Breastfeeding can have a beneficial effect on many different aspects of sustainability that may not be apparent.

Environment and Climate Change:

  • Breastfeeding uses less energy compared to making formula. It reduces the need for water, firewood and gas in the home.
  • Breastfeeding is earth friendly compared to formula feeding with zero packing, pollution and waste! Making formula involves dairy farming that stresses natural resources and adds to carbon emissions and climate change.
  • Breastfeeding creates less waste compared to formula feeding. Formula production and distribution lead to waste that pollutes the seas and affects marine life.

Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction:

  • Breastfeeding is a natural and low-cost way of feeding babies and children. It is affordable for everyone and does not burden household budgets compared to formula feeding.  Breastfeeding can contribute to poverty reduction.
  • Breastmilk is FREE.  Not breastfeeding results in financial losses of about $302 billion each year. Families worldwide spend about $54 billion every year on formula.
  • Exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding for two years and beyond provide high quality nutrients and adequate energy that can help prevent hunger, undernutrition and obesity. Breastfeeding means food security for infants.

Survival, Health, and Well-being:

  • Breastfeeding improves the health, development and survival of infants and children.  It helps to improve health and wellbeing of mothers, both in the short and long term.
  • Breastfeeding reduces a woman’s risk of breast and cervical cancer. In fact, 20,000 deaths due to breast cancer could be averted if mothers breastfed.
  • Breastfeeding is essential for readiness to learn. Breastfeeding promotes brain development and helps with learning.

Breastfeeding promotion in the community and workplace can help improve all these aspects, but it requires collaboration and effort.  The more it is talked about, the more effective these messages will become.  WIC works to promote a positive attitude towards breastfeeding.  Let’s work to promote breastfeeding to help the lives of mothers, children, our planet and future generations to come.

For more information regarding World Breastfeeding Week, check out the following resources:

National Breastfeeding Month Infographic

WABA – World Breastfeeding Week – http://worldbreastfeedingweek.org/

World Health Organization (WHO) – http://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/

 

Hydration Tips

July 2017

Summer is here and so is the heat! During these hot days be sure to stay hydrated by following some of these tips.

Hydration_July_revised

High Blood Pressure Awareness Month

May 2017

May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month and ITCA WIC would like to share some information with you. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, increases the risk of certain diseases and stroke. Heart disease and stroke are the first and seventh major causes of death amongst American Indians and Alaska Natives respectively and yet many people with high blood pressure don’t even know they have it due to a lack of signs and symptoms. High Blood Pressure Education Month encourages people to get their blood pressure checked regularly and to look at various lifestyle factors which may be contributing to high blood pressure. Check out the following resources to find out what you can do to control your blood pressure.

High Blood Pressure Education_Infographic_May
5 Surprising Facts About High Blood Pressure 
Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke & Cardiac Arrest
Definition, Causes, Treatment and Prevention of High Blood Pressure

 

 

2018 ITCA Tribal Water/Wastewater Operator of the Year Award

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 9/20/2018

Maria Dadgar,MBA
Executive Director
Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc.
602-258-4822
Brian.Bennon@itcaonline.com

 

PRESS RELEASE

 

National Tribal Water Program Selects 2018 Water/Wastewater Operator of the Year

 

Phoenix, Arizona (September 20, 2018)The National Tribal Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Program at the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., (ITCA) announced Mr. Thomas Ridley, Operations Supervisor for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe located in North Dakota, as the 2018 ITCA Tribal Water/Wastewater Operator of the Year. ITCA presents the Operator of the Year recognition award annually to a water/wastewater operator who has demonstrated exemplary work ethic, and community involvement while contributing to the high level of water quality within their water/wastewater systems.

Mr. Ridley began his career as an operator for the Standing Rock Rural Water System and was promoted to Operations Supervisor. In his time as Operations Supervisor, Mr. Ridley has assisted in improvements to the supervisory control and data acquisition control system, continues to work on a project to provide GIS mapping of the water system, and has maintained U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulatory compliance. Mr. Ridley is a certified Class III Water Distribution Specialist.

“Mr. Ridley is a great asset to both the Standing Rock Rural Water System and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe,” said Mr. Doug Mund, Senior Project Manager with Bartlett & West, Inc. “Mr. Ridley is recognized and respected by his coworkers, Tribal leaders, and his peers in both the North and South Dakota water communities as a leader in the water profession. Mr. Ridley goes above and beyond the assigned duties of his job and is a role model for providing service to others.”

Mr. Ridley was honored at the 2018 ITCA Tribal Operator of the Year Award Ceremony held on August 30, 2018, during the recent National Tribal Operations and Maintenance Summit in Temecula, California. A private award ceremony for Mr. Ridley will be held on Tuesday, September 25, 2018, at the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Administration Office in Fort Yates, North Dakota.

ITCA received nominations for the 2018 Tribal Operator of the Year Award for operators working on tribal water/wastewater systems from all across Indian Country. Mr. Ridley was one of nine nominees recognized for professional service and dedication to maintaining safe drinking water and effective wastewater management on behalf of their tribal communities.

The following nine nominees for the 2018 Tribal Operator of the Year were recognized by ITCA at the National Operations and Maintenance Summit.

  •  Ethan Arch, Program Manager
    Eastern Band of Cherokee, Water and Sewer Operations & Maintenance Program,
    Cherokee, North Carolina
  • Veronica Flores, Lab Technician/Operator
    Pueblo of Santa Anna, Pueblo of Santa Ana Utilities Department
    Santa Ana, New Mexico
  • Bruce Fox, Sr., Operations and Maintenance Supervisor
    Three Affiliated Tribes, Forth Berthold Rural Water,
    Mandaree, North Dakota
  • Jerron Henscheid, Director
    Omaha Tribe of Nebraska Utilities, Omaha Tribal Utilities
    Macy, Nebraska
  • Leslie Jodie, Maintenance Technician
    Navajo Nation, Dilcon Community School Inc.
    Winslow, Arizona
  • Kyle Leon, Interim Operations Manager
    Pueblo of Laguna, Pueblo of Laguna Utility Authority
    Laguna, New Mexico
  • Margaret McPartland, Operations and Maintenance Lead
    Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Red Hawk Casino Wastewater/Water Treatment Plant,
    Placerville, California
  • Thomas Ridley, Operations Supervisor
    Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Standing Rock Rural Water,
    Fort Yates, North Dakota
  • Dustin Voytoski, Wastewater Supervisor
    Ak-Chin Indian Community
    Maricopa, Arizona

“The need for safe and reliable drinking water and effective wastewater management is critical to the health, safety, welfare, economic viability, and self-determination goals of Tribal communities throughout Indian Country,” said Maria Dadgar, Executive Director for the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc.  “The ITCA Tribal Water Department works with hundreds of tribal water and wastewater system operators across Indian Country every year that directly protect the public health and environment of their communities.”

“The daily work performed by these public health professionals, who are often on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, is admirable.” stated Brian Bennon, ITCA Tribal Water Department Director.  “Our team believes that exceptional operators, who go above and beyond their responsibilities in making outstanding contributions to their communities, should receive recognition for their dedication.”

Over the past 25 years, the ITCA National Tribal Water Certification Program has provided training and USEPA approved drinking water and wastewater operator certifications for tribal personnel working on federal trust land and serving tribal communities.  ITCA is the largest American Indian organization offering USEPA approved operator certification.

For more information about ITCA or the National Tribal Operator Certification Program, please visit our website at www.itcaonline.com, email TWSinfo@itcaonline.com or call (602) 258-4822.

-END-

IMPORTANT: Postponement of Switching to the New ABC 2017 Exams

ITCA has postponed its use of NEW Certification Exams in 2017

Due to circumstances beyond our control, the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc (ITCA) National Tribal Water & Wastewater Operator Certification Program must postpone its switch to using the Association of Boards of Certification (ABC) new 2017 operator certification exams. 

Until further notice, the ITCA Program will continue using the existing ABC 2012 Standardized operator certification exams for both Paper-Booklet Testing and Computer-Based Testing.

For more information about this postponement, click here: Postponement of Change

If you have any questions, please contact the ITCA Tribal Water Department at (602) 258-4822.
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Stay Active in the Winter

Just because it’s the holiday season, doesn’t mean you need to take a holiday from your exercise regimen. In fact, working out during the winter has many benefits. Check out the following for information regarding physical activity during these winter month that lie ahead:

Stay Active_December_Infographic_Page_1

https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@fc/documents/downloadable/ucm_457235.pdf

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/FitnessBasics/Staying-Active-in-Cold-Weather_UCM_479901_Article.jsp#.WDN_xtIrJaQ

http://igrow.org/healthy-families/health-and-wellness/physical-activity-cold-weather/

American Diabetes Month

November 2016

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona is honoring American Diabetes Month. Diabetes rates are on the rise in the US. Today, 1 in 11 Americans has diabetes and every 23 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes. American Indians have a 2.2 times higher likelihood to have diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites. There was a 68% increase in diabetes between 1994 and 2004 among American Indian youths aged 15-19. Data from the 2009 Indian Health Services’ (IHS) National Patient Information Reporting System (NPIRS) indicate that 14.2 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives aged 20 years or older who received care from IHS had diagnosed diabetes. Statistics show that diabetes causes more deaths than AIDS and breast cancer combined.

People with diabetes can experience serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, blindness, chronic kidney disease, nervous system damage, and amputations. But people with diabetes who work with their health care providers and take care of their health can take steps to control the disease and lower the risk of complications and premature death.

There are a few types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational. Type 1 is also referred to as juvenile diabetes because it typically appears in adolescence. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5 percent of people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases. This form of diabetes is caused by a combination of things; genetics, extra weight, specifically extra fat around the waist, and more. Gestational diabetes only appears in pregnant women and develops in 2 to 10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually disappears when a pregnancy is over. However, if not treated, it can cause problems for mothers and babies.

The CDC reports that healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic therapies for type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes require oral medication, insulin, or both to control blood glucose levels. Healthy eating, physical activity, and insulin injections are the basic therapies for type 1 diabetes. The amount of insulin taken must be balanced with food intake and daily activities. Blood glucose levels must be closely monitored through frequent blood glucose testing. People should see a health care provider who will monitor their diabetes control and help them learn to manage their diabetes. People with diabetes also may see ophthalmologists for eye examinations; podiatrists for routine foot care; and dietitians and diabetes educators who teach the skills needed for daily diabetes management

Adapted from: https://www.cdc.gov/media/matte/2011/11_diabetes_Native_American.pdf

For more information, check out:
Diabetes Month Infographic
http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/american-diabetes-month.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/about-niddk/research-areas/diabetes/diabetes-prevention-program-dpp/message-hope-prevent-diabetes-native-american-communities/Pages/default.aspx

World Food Day

October 2016

The Food and Agriculture Organization put out the following information regarding World Food Day 2016:

Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too.

One of the biggest issues related to climate change is food supply and food security and with our population growing each day, this problem affects more and more people. Everyone has a role to play in lessening the effects of climate change. Countries need to invest in stallholder farmers and sustainably increase food production, but there are also a number of actions that you can take to help. By being a conscientious or ethical consumer and changing simple day-to-day decisions, for example, by wasting less food, or eating less meat, we can reduce our environmental footprint and make a difference.

For more information on World Food Day and how to do your part to reduce food loss and our carbon footprint, check out the following resources:

http://www.fao.org/world-food-day/2016/theme/en/
http://www.fao.org/world-food-day/2016/climate-actions/en/

World Food Day Infographic_October_new

 

Fruit and Veggies – More Matters

September 2016

The Inter Tribal Council on Arizona is celebrating September with the Fruit and Veggies – More Matters Campaign. The American Indian population has among the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States. Studies have shown that among overweight adults, higher intakes of green leafy or dark yellow vegetables were significantly associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of both adults and children do not eat the amount of fruits and vegetables recommended by the latest dietary guidelines. Dietitians recommend filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables.  Try these tips to help meet this goal:

  1. Fruit Skewers – Frozen fruit chunks such as grapes, banana slices, blueberries, mango or watermelon on skewers – make a rainbow on a stick.
  2. Breakfast Boost – Add bananas or berries to your morning cereal or oatmeal. If you eat an omelet, add bell peppers and onions for some extra flavor and nutrition.
  3. Fill up on Veggies – Making soup, pizza, sandwiches, or lasagna? Try adding some vegetables such as spinach, tomatoes, bell peppers, carrots, mushrooms, etc.
  4. Be Sneaky – If you have a picky eater, try shredding or finely dicing some veggies into some of their favorite dishes.
  5. Feature a Fresh New Vegetable– have your child pick out a new vegetable each week and incorporate that vegetable into your meals or snacks. Children are much more likely to try something new when they pick it out themselves.
  6. Goodbye Cookie – Try offering fruits and veggies with a dip as a snack instead of cookies or crackers.  Studies show the popularity of serving cookies as a children’s’ snack is on the decline. Fruit is now the number one snack item parents give to children under the age of six. Try sliced cucumbers, carrots, bell peppers, apples etc.
  7. Smoothies – Try using yogurt and your favorite mixture of fruits to blend together into a smoothie as a refreshing drink.
  8. Salad on the side – Try offering a small side salad at dinner time. Children can fill their plate with how ever much they want.

 

Reasons why to eat more fruits and vegetables?

  1. They are delicious!
  2. Fun to eat – some crunch, squirt, some you can peel, and some you can grow in your own backyard!
  3. Quick, convenient, and natural – fruits and vegetables are natures treat – they are very portable and easy to pack as a snack.
  4. Variety – They come in so many colors, shapes, and sizes.
  5. Vitamins and minerals – they pack a lot of nutrients to keep you feeling healthy and energized.
  6. May reduce risk of diseases – eating a variety of fruits and vegetables may reduce a person’s risk of many diseased including heart disease, high blood pressure, and cancer.
  7. Low in calories.
  8. Fiber – fruits and veggies provide fiber that helps fill you up and keeps your digestive system happy.

Adapted from: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/September+is+Fruits+%26+Veggies–More+Matters+Month

To learn more about the importance of fruits and veggies, check out the following resources:
Fruit and Veggies – More Matters Infographic
http://www.choosemyplate.gov/
https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary-guidance/fruits-veggies-more-matters-resources/fruits-veggies-more-matters

 

Beat the Heat! Stay Hydrated!

Arizona is one of the hottest places on earth from May to September which makes heat related illness very common during these months. Over 1,500 deaths from exposure to excessive natural heat have occurred in Arizona from 2000 to 2012. Anyone can be affected by heat-related illness but children under 4 years of age are at an even greater risk. One of the best ways to prevent heat related illness is to stay hydrated. The amount of water someone needs is variable depending on age, heat exposure, activity and other factors. Everyone should drink enough water to quench their thirst, however in extreme heat; we may forget to drink enough water. Most people will need at least 8-10 cups of water under normal conditions. More water may be needed if it is hot and the person is active. Try to minimize alcohol and caffeine intake because these drink may dehydrate you more. Offer kids water instead of sugary beverages such as juice, soda, Gatorade, kool-aid, and sweet tea.

Heat-related illness usually comes in stages. The signal of the first stage is thirst. Drinking water at this stage can prevent you from progressing to the more serious kinds of heat related illnesses. When temperatures are on the rise, watch for these other symptoms of heat related illness:
• Thirst, dry mouth and skin
• Headache
• Dizziness and confusion
• Nausea
• Fatigue
• Less frequent urination
• Increased heart rate
Check out the following resources to stay cool this summer and stay hydrated.

Stay Hydrated Infographic

Hydration- What you need to know

Hydration- Why It’s so Important

WIC services begin at NACA in Flagstaff

Native Americans for Community Action (NACA) began offering WIC services in Flagstaff on June 28, 2016! Call 928-773-1245 for an appointment or visit them at 1500 E. Cedar Ave, Suite 26 in Flagstaff.

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